IBR on The Cruelest Sport

Danny Garcia

“You can roll your eyes at the redemptive narrative of Zab Judah, but the fact that he has clung to relevance over seventeen years is no meager accomplishment. Despite the worst intentions of men like Kostya Tszyu, Miguel Cotto, and Floyd Mayweather, Jr., and a history of self-sabotage that runs the length of the comedo-tragic spectrum, Judah, 42-7 (29), has staved off inconsequence time and again. And while his speed and power—relatively undiminished in his 35th year of life—will continue to award Judah the proverbial puncher’s chance, those physical attributes alone do not explain his materializing against Danny Garcia at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, on Saturday night.”

Cinders And Smoke: Danny Garcia-Zab Judah Preview on The Cruelest Sport.

Advertisement

IBR on The Cruelest Sport

Brandon Rios v Mike Alvarado

“To alter his fate Alvarado would have to outbox his rugged antagonist, and while Rios could be outboxed, the odds of a thuggish former wrestler who came late to the sport being able to do it were slim. Yet this is precisely what Alvarado did. Under the lights of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, a city fueled by foregone conclusions and hopeless delusions, Alvarado outboxed Rios over twelve heated rounds, winning a unanimous decision.”

Read “Blood In, Blood Out: Mike Alvarado W12 Brandon Rios” on The Cruelest Sport.

IBR on The Cruelest Sport

Rios_Alvarado_121013_001a

‘“First lies, then pressure, then more lies, then more pressure, then the truth. That is how you get the truth.” This is the cruel methodology of Colonel Joll in “Waiting for the Barbarians.” One can see this drama playing out as Alvarado boxes to middling effect; Rios all the while pressuring him, hurting him, and exhorting him to reciprocate until the lies are worn away and this truth is bared: an entertaining loss to Rios may be Alvarado’s ceiling as a fighter.’

Read Turning Screws: On Brandon Rios-Mike Alvarado II on The Cruelest Sport.