IBR ON HANNIBAL BOXING

There are the lights to contend with, their heat and burst, their merciless illumination. The pressure of the moment, too, pregnant with disaster, ready to rewrite, to unmake. And the dialogue, unpredictable, violent, violently unpredictable. Over and over this disorienting assault hunts for lies, falsity, and what it cannot uncover, it creates. A fight with Shawn Porter is an interrogation. You endure that interrogation with the truth; you sabotage it by being something more. Terrence Crawford is something more.

Read Heightened Predation: Terence Crawford TKO10 Shawn Porter on Hannibal Boxing.

IBR ON HANNIBAL BOXING

“You do not beat Saul Alvarez, who Plant faced at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, on Saturday, with evasion—the four-corners offense does not work when your opponent has the lead. Alvarez, by virtue of popularity and its attendant economic windfall, always has the lead. He is ahead on the scores at the opening bell, and it is his opponent’s responsibility to undo that advanced arithmetic. Moreover, every Alvarez opponent must do so without losing his head or liver. Alas Plant, who found some success against Alvarez, never managed to overcome the scoring disadvantage. Nor did he keep his head. Because Plant never fought to win.”

Read The Only Super Super-Middleweight: Saul Alvarez TKO11 Caleb Plant on Hannibal Boxing.

IBR on Hannibal Boxing

“He is not better than Tyson Fury. Fury proved that over three fights—arguably in each one—and never more comprehensively than he did at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Saturday. Twice on the canvas in round four, Fury steadied himself then ground Wilder to bits, corkscrewing him to the canvas in round eleven. He’d survived Wilder in their first fight, battered him in their second; accomplishing both in their third fight makes a fourth less than a priority. That may be an unpopular opinion now, but the drama over the second half of Saturday’s fight owes much to the question of how Wilder remained upright and his reputation as a puncher. In hindsight, the latter was less of a factor than it seemed, which is why the momentum stopped shifting when Fury got up. As for Wilder’s remarkable toughness, consider this question: How does he use it to win?”

Read The Diffusing: Tyson Fury Butchers Deontay Wilder Again on Hannibal Boxing.